Sport Boxing ‘Gypsy King’ Tyson Fury beats Deontay Wilder, then serenades Las Vegas crowd
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‘Gypsy King’ Tyson Fury beats Deontay Wilder, then serenades Las Vegas crowd

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‘Gypsy King’ Tyson Fury celebrates his win over Deontay Wilder. Photo: Getty
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Tyson Fury reclaimed his world heavyweight boxing title and then serenaded the Las Vegas crowd in a one-sided bout with Deontay Wilder on Sunday afternoon (AEDT).

The much-anticipated fight at the MGM Grand Garden Arena was totally dominated by Fury, who won when Wilder’s camp threw in the towel in the seventh round.

Fury dropped Wilder in rounds three and five and consistently landed punches on his opponent in the rematch.

The pair fought out a controversial draw in 2018.

The 31-year-old Fury remains unbeaten, with 31 wins, and was last world heavyweight champion when he beat Wladimir Klitschko in 2015.

It was the first time Wilder, 34, had tasted defeat in 44 fights.

British fighter Fury celebrated his victory by singing Don McLean’s American Pie to the crowd, who bellowed out it with the 2.06-metre champ.

Fury paid tribute to his opponent in the immediate aftermath.

“I want to say a big shout out to Deontay Wilder. He came here tonight. He manned up. He really did show the heart of a champion,” he said.

“He got up and battled onto round seven … he is a warrior. He will be back. He will be a champion again.

“But I will say that the king has returned to the top of the throne.”

Fury, who is known as ‘The Gypsy King’, entered the arena sitting on a throne.

He urged the crowd to “sing along if you know the words” when performing his post-fight song.

Wilder was realistic following the fight, even though he expressed disappointment that his camp called off the fight.

“I’m doing good … days like this happen,” Wilder said.

“The best man won tonight, but my trainer, my coach threw in the towel … it is what it is.

“I’m a warrior and that’s what I do … there’s no excuses and we come back stronger.

“Even ‘The Greatest’ (Muhammad Ali] lost and came back, you know what I’m saying. That’s part of it.

“I’ll come back even stronger next time around.

“That’s what big-time boxing is about. The best must fight the best.”

Wilder started the 11th defence of his heavyweight crown on the back foot, with Fury controlling the early exchanges.

Fury then flexed his muscle in the third round, with a strong right hand putting Wilder on the canvas.

The considerable size difference (five centimetres) between the pair was working in Fury’s favour and although Wilder grappled his way through the fourth, he was again put down in the fifth with a body shot.

Wilder was bleeding from the ear and Fury appeared to lick his rival’s blood in the sixth round.

The end was coming and Wilder’s camp saw sense, calling proceedings off with 1min 39sec remaining in the seventh round.

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