Sponsored Use of hearing aids linked to lower risk of Dementia
Updated:

Use of hearing aids linked to lower risk of Dementia

Studies show that wearing a hearing aid could reduce the risk of developing dementia and other common health issues as you age. Photo: Getty
Share
Twitter Facebook Reddit Pinterest Email

Two recent studies from top universities in the US and UK have found that individuals who wear hearing aids to treat their hearing loss maintain better brain function and health.

If you’re one of the estimated 3.5 million Aussies that could benefit from a hearing aid, this new research shows that if your hearing loss is left untreated, you may be up to 33% more likely to develop dementia as you age.

The recent studies by the University of Exeter and the University of Michigan provide evidence that encouraging people to wear an effective hearing aid may help protect their brains and reduce their risk of dementia.

They also found that older adults who get a hearing aid for newly diagnosed hearing loss have a lower risk of being diagnosed with dementia, depression, or anxiety, and a lower risk of suffering fall-related injuries than those who leave their hearing loss uncorrected.

Left untreated, hearing loss can lead to social isolation as well as mental and physical decline. Photo: Getty

The risk of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s within three years of a hearing loss diagnosis was 18% lower for hearing aid users.

The risk of depression or anxiety was 11% lower and the risk of fall-related injuries was 13% lower among hearing aid users.

Left untreated, hearing loss can lead to social isolation as well as mental and physical decline. Don’t let this happen to you or your loved ones.

According to the Hearing Care Industry Association, only one in four people who could benefit from a hearing aid have one and there is an average of seven years between a person needing a hearing aid and taking the steps to get one.

This article is opinion only and should not be taken as medical or financial advice. Check with a financial professional before making any decisions.

References: https://www.exeter.ac.uk/news/research/title_725112_en.html, http://www.hcia.com.au/resources/HCIA.pdf,  Journal of the American Geriatrics Society