Sponsored Five traits of a serial job-hopper
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Five traits of a serial job-hopper

Our five telltale signs if you're a job-hopper Photo Getty
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Hopping from one job to the next was frowned upon a decade ago. Today it’s how the average worker likes to roll.

Switching jobs can help you pick up extra skill sets and learn efficiencies you wouldn’t necessarily absorb from one workplace.

Along the way you’re more likely to narrow down your preferred job and define what you want from a workplace.

However, there are some speed bumps along the way.

Playing musical jobs means you’re likely to bump into the same group of people, particularly if you remain in one industry. This means word can spread fast if you’re on the hunt for your next job. While gossip may be out of your control, navigating work life as a job-hopper is a whole lot easier if you don’t burn your bridges.

Always be respectful of the relationships you built at your last job because they may come into play in the future.

Your future employer may raise an eyebrow at the long list of jobs on your resume. Impress them with the projects you have worked on and be honest about your quest for life-long learning via different roles.

If you’re still not sure you’re a job-hopper, check out our five telltale signs.

1. You’re just not interested

Poor engagement is a sure sign you’ve got one foot out the door. Your work needs to energise and motivate you, not bore you. Businesses who want to keep their employees know how to create a healthy and stimulating workplace to bring out the best in their staff.

Don’t dwell in the frustration of disengagement. Take the chance to explore opportunities for change within your current company, and if they don’t meet your expectations, look elsewhere.

Your work needs to energise and motivate you, not bore you
Your work needs to energise and motivate you, not bore you

2. You’re not scared of jumping ship

Job-hoppers are excited by the next opportunity, not frightened by the uncertainty of job hunting. They see the lack of an income as the perfect driver to investigate new roles and nail interviews.

We are in a brave new economy where employees weld considerable power in the workforce. Global and local opportunities are in plentiful supply and employers are realising just how hard they have to work to keep staff happy.

Job-hoppers are taking full advantage and developing a sense of adaptability and agility non-job-hoppers could only dream of.

3. You’re yearning for a challenge

Apple’s Steve Jobs and Atlassian’s Mike Cannon-Brookes and Steve Farquhar are our start-up poster kids. They know dreaming big and punching hard isn’t just a Disney dream. Taking risks and huge challenges are what today’s workers crave.

Nurture your ambition by chasing the job you really want. Initiative and drive are leadership qualities recognised by employers and respected by colleagues.

4. You know the right job is out there

Those who have done the hard yards know the perfect job is waiting for them. Contemporary workplaces are more employee-centric and here, firms like Google have set the benchmark.

Continuous learning is what every worker desires and there’s no shame in hunting for a job that offers just that.

5. It’s not just about the money

Job-hoppers want to feel inspired and valued. Often, they are willing to sacrifice a high salary to work with a sense of purpose and fulfilment.

Not being driven by money is a double-edged sword. A job that satisfies you intellectually and ethically is gold, but that satisfaction will dwindle if your income doesn’t increase as your career progresses.

Job-hop away, but keep one thing stable – your super. It’s important to stay with one fund and not let fees eat away at your savings.

No matter how many jobs you have, AustralianSuper will be there while your career advances in leaps and bounds.


AustralianSuper

This article has been sponsored by AustralianSuper Pty Ltd ABN 94 006 457 987, AFSL 233788, the Trustee of AustralianSuper ABN 65 714 394 898. The views and opinions expressed in any article accessed through The New Daily are those of the author or The New Daily and not the responsibility of AustralianSuper. For more information about AustralianSuper, please visit australiansuper.com