News World Hot water: Donald Trump tries to change US laws to protect his hair
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Hot water: Donald Trump tries to change US laws to protect his hair

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US President Donald Trump quite likes his trademark barnet. So much so, he’s attempting to change US law to safeguard it.

As the race to the White House heats up before the November 3 poll, Mr Trump had other priorities on Wednesday as the US Energy Department proposed to ease water efficiency requirements for showerheads.

The President has made multiple complaints about the struggles of washing his hair due to the water flow and rallied against “drip, drip, drip” showers, low-flow toilets as well as taps and other appliances.

“You turn on the shower – if you’re like me, you can’t wash your beautiful hair properly,” Mr Trump said during a visit to an Ohio manufacturing plant earlier this month.

“You waste 20 minutes longer. Please come out. The water, it drips, right?”

The plan would allow manufacturers to bypass a 2.5 gallon-per-minute maximum flow rate set by Congress in the 1990s, Bloomberg reports.

Currently, all the showerheads in a single shower count towards that maximum flow rate, but under the new plan, multiple showerheads can be installed in each shower each with a 2.5 gallon-per-minute (9.5 litres) flow rate.

Environmental group Appliance Standards Awareness Project says it would subvert a law signed by Republican George HW Bush in 1992 and would lead to a huge uptick in water waste and greenhouse gas.

“There really is no good reason to reduce water and energy standards that have been around for 20 years,” executive director Andrew deLaski told Bloomberg.

The campaign continues

Joe Biden has raised $US26 million ($36.4 million) in the 24 hours after he named Kamala Harris as his running mate, doubling his previous one-day record.

Democrats are close to matching, if not surpassing, the massive $US300 million cash stockpile President Donald Trump and Republicans reported in July. Ms Harris is expected to play a key role in that effort.

Ms Harris joined Mr Biden in Delaware on Thursday (Australian time) for their first fundraiser together as running mates, where she talked to grassroots donors about how her parents’ activism inspired her interest in politics.

With large in-person events out of the question due to the pandemic, the campaign has an aggressive schedule of online fundraisers planned for Ms Harris.

That could play to one of her political strengths and offset an area where Mr Biden has sometimes struggled.

Meanwhile Mr Trump had a diplomatic win with the surprise announcement that he had helped broker a peace deal between Israel and the United Arab Emirates.

The deal will fully normalise relations and follows a history of peace efforts between Israel and the Palestinians and their Arab allies that have failed to overcome decades of distrust and violence.

-with AAP