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World shows violent terrorists what fraternité really means

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Symbols of unity and togetherness are appearing around the globe as people express their solidarity with not only the victims of the deadly attacks in Paris, but all of France.

French flags have been flying on national landmarks while the fences of French embassies have been decorated in floral tributes, notes and candles from people mourning those who died, were wounded or witnessed the horrific events.

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Global vigils

Vigils and memorial services are being held worldwide, including in Australia.

Two hundred people carried flags and signs and sang the national anthem at a vigil in Sydney’s Martin Place on Saturday night. A Sunday prayer service filled St Andrews Cathedral and was attended by NSW Premier Mike Baird and representatives from the French government.

Melburnians gathered at Federation Square on Sunday night, while in Darwin, a small community of French expats and travellers gathered to pay tribute to victims.

There are plans to hold memorial services and vigils in many Australian cities in the coming week.

Here’s how people around the planet displayed their solidarity for Parisians.

Members of Sydney's French community light candles at a vigil in Martin Place. Photo: Getty
Members of Sydney’s French community light candles at a vigil in Martin Place. Photo: Getty
Getty
Londoners hold a vigil in Trafalgar Square. Photo: Getty
Mourners lay flowers in front of the French Embassy in Ottawa. Photo: Getty
Mourners lay flowers in front of the French Embassy in Ottawa, Canada. Photo: Getty
Candles and flowers at the fence of the French Embassy in Prague. Photo: Getty
Candles and flowers at the fence of the French Embassy in Prague. Photo: Getty
A flag is flown at a vigil in Washington D.C. Photo: Getty
A flag is flown at a vigil in Washington D.C. Photo: Getty

Landmarks light up

Iconic architecture such as Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate, New York’s One World Trade Center and the Sydney Opera House have all been lit up with the blue, white and red of the French flag.

Meanwhile, the replica Eiffel Tower in Paris Las Vegas was dimmed to show respect for the 129 people who died in the attacks.

Mourners lay flowers and candles in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Germany. Photo: Getty
Mourners lay flowers and candles in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Germany. Photo: Getty
The One World Trade Center in New York. Photo: AAP
The One World Trade Center in New York. Photo: AAP
Parliament House in Canberra. Photo: AAP
Parliament House in Canberra. Photo: AAP
Getty
Sydney Opera House lit up in blue, white and red. Photo: Getty
Getty
The Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro illuminated in the colours of the French flag. Photo: Getty
Getty
The Oriental Pearl TV Tower in Shanghai. Photo: Getty
Jerusalem's Old City Ottoman Walls were also lit up. Photo: Getty
Jerusalem’s Old City Ottoman Walls were also lit up. Photo: Getty
The replica Eiffel Tower on the Las Vegas Strip is dimmed. Photo: Getty
The replica Eiffel Tower on the Las Vegas Strip is dimmed. Photo: Getty

Sporting world mourns

Players and spectators at sporting matches around the world held a minute of silence to show support for France and the victims.

Supporters waved signs and French flags alongside team colours while NHL matches across North America lit up rinks with red, white and blue.

Sydney FC fans display the French flag at the A-League game against Melbourne victory. Photo: Getty
Sydney FC fans display the French flag at the A-League game against Melbourne Victory. Photo: Getty
Getty
A moment of silence at the Toronto Maple Leafs and Vancouver Canucks match. Photo: Getty
Portuguese and Russian players observe a minute's silence before their friendly. Photo: AAP
Portuguese and Russian players observe a minute’s silence before their football friendly. Photo: AAP

-with ABC

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