News World ‘I haven’t lied for my dad Rolf’
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‘I haven’t lied for my dad Rolf’

Rolf Harris
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Rolf Harris’s daughter has denied lying about a childhood friend’s relationship with her famous father to help him in his sex abuse trial.

Bindi Nicholls cried in court when speaking about her former best friend who claims Harris abused her from the age of 13.

Ms Nicholls backed her dad’s claim that the pair actually had a consensual “affair” which started after the family friend turned 18.

Prosecutor Sasha Wass QC on Monday asked Ms Nicholls if she was telling the truth or helping her father.

“This isn’t about helping my father, it’s about me telling the truth,” the 50-year-old replied.

The alleged victim claims Harris first indecently assaulted her when she joined the family on an overseas trip in 1978.

But Ms Nicholls said the two teenagers were inseparable and she never saw any inappropriate contact.

She broke down when recalling how “devastated” she was when her family shifted to Bray, west of London, in 1980.

The exact timing of the move away from her friend in south London is in dispute.

Ms Wass asked Ms Nicholls why she’d initially told police the family relocated “straight after” her mid-year exams but then told the court it was December.

The prosecutor said Harris argued the later date because it was closer to the complainant’s 16th birthday and meant there was less time for any underage assaults at Bray.

“I’m suggesting you and your father have colluded to give the same evidence,” Ms Wass said.

But the entertainer’s daughter insisted: “No, we hardly talk, my dad and I. It’s not really something we sit down and talk about.”

Ms Nicholls said it was “ridiculous” and “laughable” for her childhood friend to claim Harris performed oral sex on her when she was 15 with Bindi asleep in the next bed.

Ms Wass also grilled Ms Nicholls on why she’d had a solicitor – paid for by Harris – present when interviewed by police.

“You’ve seen the films, everyone always has a solicitor don’t they,” Ms Nicholls said.

Ms Wass told her suspects usually did, but not witnesses.

The prosecutor went on to suggest Ms Nicholls was financially dependent on Harris. She admitted he provided a “monthly income”.

Ms Wass read a mid-2012 email from Ms Nicholls to her father in which she asked if she was the sole inheritor of his STG11 million estate.

She said if that was true she needed to help run the company.

Earlier, the court heard Ms Nicholls first discussed her friend’s sexual relationship with Harris in the mid-1990s.

The pair had been talking about Ms Nicholl’s suspicion that her father was having an affair with a “spiritual healer”.

The complainant, then in her early 30s, called the woman a “cow” and asked what Harris saw in her, Ms Nicholls said.

“It felt like she was in love with my dad.”

Harris’s daughter asked her friend if she’d been seeing her father to which she reportedly replied: “It’s been going on since I was 18 or 19.”

The alleged victim insists she told Bindi her father had abused her since the age of 13.

“No, she never said that,” Ms Nicholls said on Monday.

The 50-year-old told the court she later rang her dad and accused him of having an affair with her friend.

She admitted telling police that when she heard about the affair she so distraught she was “bashing her head against the wall” and “wanted to stab myself with forks”. Later she was “suicidal”.

Ms Nicholls has refused to release her therapy notes which Ms Wass argued could reveal whether the alleged victim told her friend she’d been abused by Harris or rather had an affair.

Harris’s daughter on Monday said the counselling notes were “private”.

She did reveal, however, that she was frightened her parents “might die in the middle of this court case”.

That prompted Ms Wass to asked if she ever thought about her former friend.

Ms Nicholls insisted: “I love her very much.”

Harris denies indecently assaulting four girls in the UK between 1968 and 1986.