News World China launches first moon rover mission
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China launches first moon rover mission

The Chang'e-3 rocket blasts off in the southwest province of Sichuan
China has successfully launched its first moon rover mission in the country's southwest.
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China has launched its first moon rover mission, the latest step in an ambitious space program seen as a symbol of its rising global stature.

The Chang’e-3 mission is named for the goddess of the moon in Chinese mythology and the rover vehicle is called Yutu, or Jade Rabbit, after her pet.

The Long March-3B carrier rocket – China’s largest such vehicle – blasted off on Monday, live coverage on state broadcaster CCTV showed.

As it shot into the night sky, mission observers could be heard reporting at regular intervals that events were proceeding “normally”.

Within an hour the launch centre’s director Zhang Zhenzhong appeared before staff and declared the mission a “success”, CCTV showed.

The probe is due to land on the moon in mid-December to explore its surface and look for natural resources. It is the world’s third lunar rover mission following the United States and former Soviet Union decades ago.

China sees its space program as a symbol of its growing international status and technological advancement, as well as of the Communist Party’s success in reversing the fortunes of the once impoverished nation.

It aims to establish a permanent space station by 2020 and eventually send a human to the moon.

Users of Sina Weibo, a Chinese version of Twitter, expressed pride and excitement in the hours after the launch.

“This makes Chinese people get excited and forget their own bad situation,” one poster wrote.

“Every time they launch a rocket, it’s very moving,” said another. “Soon, Chinese people will be able to go to the moon.”

The mission will bolster scientific knowledge as well as national pride, said Morris Jones, an independent space analyst based in Australia.

“The Chinese are making rapid advances in spaceflight,” he said. “They’re going to get a lot of prestige out of this mission.”

The moon remains “largely unexplored”, Jones added, so “I expect that the Chinese rover will probably throw a few surprises our way scientifically”.

Since 2003 China has sent 10 astronauts into space and launched an orbiting space module, Tiangong-1. It also sent probes to orbit the moon in 2007 and 2010, the first of which intentionally crashed into the lunar surface at the end of its mission.

The second probe was sent to “verify key technology”, orbit the moon and take pictures of the landing site in preparation for Chang’e-3, before being sent into deep space to monitor an asteroid, said the official news agency Xinhua.