News State Victoria News Victorian budget: Police to dish out 1000s more on-the-spot fines
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Victorian budget: Police to dish out 1000s more on-the-spot fines

Treasurer Tim Pallas released the election-year budget on Tuesday.
Treasurer Tim Pallas released the election-year budget on Tuesday. Photo: AAP
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Victoria Police will hand out tens of thousands more on-the-spot fines this year than previously projected, new figures show.

Residents should expect to cough up $12 million more in the 2018-19 financial year than was expected, analysis by The New Daily revealed.

Last year’s state budget projected police would hand out $138 million in on-the-spot fines in 2018-19. But Treasurer Tim Pallas revised the figure up to $150 million in this year’s budget, released on Tuesday.

That $12 million difference would amount to 60,606 more fines for driving less than 10km/h over the limit, based on the current $198 penalty.

On-the-spot fines, or infringement notices, can be handed out for traffic and transport offences, littering, and other offences dealt with outside courts.

The papers revealed a total of $785 million in fines would bolster state coffers in 2018-19, down from the $836 million earlier projected – but up from $733 million in the current financial year.

In a statement to The New Daily, Mr Pallas acknowledged overall fine revenue would be up this year.

“While fines revenue is expected to be higher in 2018-19, this is due to a growing population, a continued focus on road safety and the associated rollout of improved road safety cameras to encourage drivers to slow down and save lives,” the Treasurer said.

But the budget’s statement of finances said traffic camera revenue would be down “as a result of planned roadworks”.

Road safety cameras will be responsible for $371 million in fine revenue in 2018-19, instead of the $401 million earlier predicted.

The cameras target speeding, traffic lights and other traffic offences.

Toll road evasion fines will also be down $33 million on earlier expectations, because toll road operators will collect revenue themselves – reducing the amount passed onto the state.

The election-year budget splashed much-needed funds on a $13.7 billion roads and rail construction boom.

The New Daily contacted Victoria Police for comment.

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