News State Queensland Gold Coast drug bust
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Gold Coast drug bust

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An extensive bikie drug ring operating out of Gold Coast nightclubs has been busted, stopping $26 million worth of drugs hitting the streets.

Police will allege Ivan Tesic, who is claimed to have links to outlaw bikies, was the mastermind, and distributed cocaine through Club Liv, which he part owns.

Drugs were sourced from Sydney and were driven to the coast in cars which had been modified to hide the stashes.

Bikies and associates of the Bandidos, Finks, Mongols, Rebels, Highway 61 and Lone Wolves as well as DJs and club managers were in on the sales.

Tesic, who is listed as an extreme risk by national law enforcement agencies, was arrested in Sydney on Friday.

He’s expected to be extradited to Queensland and charged under the state’s anti-bikie legislation.

Bandidos sergeant-at-arms Josh Downey was also arrested at Airlie Beach on Friday.

It’s the biggest bust seen on the glitter strip and follows a 19-month investigation by 100 officers.

(The operation) targeted the higher level offenders that aren’t normally touched by police

Two Surfers Paradise nightclubs and a number of homes on the Gold Coast, Sydney and Airlie Beach were raided over the last three days.

Since the start of the operation in August 2012, 15.5kg of cocaine, MDMA and methamphetamine and six litres of methamphetamine oil which could have been used to make $11 million in drugs have been seized.

The whole operation stopped $26 million in drugs being sold.

Police will seek to retain four luxury homes and cars, including a Porsche, as well as $500,000 worth of cash and a watch, also worth $500,000.

To date, 152 people have been arrested, including 37 alleged outlaw bikies and associates.

“(The operation) targeted the higher level offenders that aren’t normally touched by police,” Detective Superintendent David Hutchinson said.

“They’ve been living the high life at the expense of our youth and the rest of the community.

“They may think that they are safe but we are always watching and they never know when we’re going to pounce.”