News State New South Wales Evie Amati trial shown police interview with accused hours after axe attack
Updated:

Evie Amati trial shown police interview with accused hours after axe attack

Evie Amati is on trial in the NSW District Court over the attack in January 2017. Photo: ABC News
Share
Twitter Facebook Reddit Pinterest Email

A jury has been played video of the woman who carried out the axe attack at the Enmore 7-Eleven speaking calmly and articulately to police in the hours after the incident.

Evie Amati is on trial in the NSW District Court over the attack in January 2017 and pleaded not guilty to several charges including grievous bodily harm with intent to murder.

On Monday her police interview, which was recorded 14 hours after she entered the inner-Sydney convenience store, was released by the court.

“The allegation is you used an axe to strike someone in the head. It was an unprovoked attack that was captured on CCTV footage, quite clear footage. Are you able to comment on that at all?” the detective asked.

“I respectfully decline to answer that question,” Ms Amati replied.

“Are you able to comment on the reason as to why this happened?” the detective continued.

“I respectfully decline to answer that question,” she repeated.

“Are you able to tell me what you were doing last night?” he asked.

“I respectfully decline to answer that question,” she replied.

Ms Amati answered in that way more than 10 times during the 10-minute police interview.

Evie Amati has not denied using the axe. Photo: Facebook

The transgender woman’s trial heard that she did not deny using the axe that night.

However she said she was not guilty of all charges because she was mentally ill and affected by gender-transition drugs, cannabis, alcohol and amphetamines.

During the police interview Ms Amati would only confirm basic details like her name, address and phone number.

When she was shown printed images taken from security cameras that captured the attack she did not comment, but agreed to sign the pages to confirm she had been shown them.

“Do you agree this person is you?” the detective asked.

“I respectfully exercise my right to silence,” Ms Amati replied.

The court heard when police arrested Ms Amati that night she was unresponsive, but paramedics said she was not unconscious.

They told the court she became agitated when they took her to hospital and had to be sedated.

Defence barrister Charles Waterstreet has asked the jury to consider that while the body of his client was in the 7-Eleven that night, her mind was not.

The trial continues.

ABC