News State NSW News University student charged under NSW ‘revenge porn’ laws for allegedly targeting teen girl
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University student charged under NSW ‘revenge porn’ laws for allegedly targeting teen girl

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An Illawarra university student has become one of the first people to be charged under New South Wales’ new “revenge porn” laws after allegedly using images sent to him to procure sex with a teenage girl.

Jarrad Pavric, 20, appeared in Wollongong Local Court on Thursday charged with two counts of threatening to distribute intimate content without consent, intentionally distributing images without consent and procuring a child for unlawful sexual activity.

Police alleged Pavric got a 14-year-old girl to send him intimate pictures of herself via social media.

He then allegedly threatened to publish them online if she did not perform sexual acts on him.

In a statement of facts tendered during a bail application, police alleged Pavric received photos of the girl and then asked her for sex.

When she refused, Pavric allegedly told her if she wanted him to delete her pictures from his phone she had to come to his house and perform a sex act on him.

Days later, Pavric allegedly sent two of the pictures to another person, saying: “I was going to post these photos on Instagram.”

Police were informed on Tuesday and began an investigation.

Computers, mobile phones and electronic equipment at his Horsley home were seized for forensic examination.

Pavric was arrested at 3pm on Wednesday and charged at Lake Illawarra Police Station.

In opposing bail, police said the alleged victim’s parents were concerned Pavric would contact her.

Further, Pavric would likely face a custodial sentence if found guilty.

Imad Abdul-Karim granted Pavric bail on the condition he live at an address in Horsley, not use the internet and only have one mobile phone, which police can inspect up to five times a week.

An interim apprehended violence order was also made.

Pavric will reappear in Wollongong Local Court in November.

Laws criminalise revenge porn

Laws to criminalise the non-consensual distribution of intimate images, known as “revenge porn” came into effect in August.

Offenders who shared or threatened to share explicit images without consent face up to three years in jail and an $11,000 fine.

The penalties apply to adults and those under 18 and cover photos and videos of a person’s private parts or a person engaging in a private act like undressing, showering or having sex.

Courts can also issue “take down” orders requiring offenders to delete or destroy images taken or distributed without consent.

“It’s not the victim’s fault when a revenge porn image goes viral. Victims might have consented to the image being taken in a private moment, but that doesn’t mean they want it shared with the world,” NSW Attorney-General Mark Speakman said in August.

Research by RMIT University indicates that one in five Australians have experienced image-based abuse.

—ABC