News Politics Australian Politics Federal Election 2022 Game-changing Democracy Sausage website helps voters make crucial election decision
Updated:

Game-changing Democracy Sausage website helps voters make crucial election decision

Democracy sausage
The humble sausage in bread has been elevated to an election day tradition. Photo: AAP
Share
Twitter Facebook Reddit Pinterest Email

A new website is set to change the way, and where, Australians vote on Saturday.

The humble snag in bread has been elevated to a polling-day tradition over the past decade, earning it the lofty title of the ‘democracy sausage’.

The website’s comprehensive, searchable map is emerging as an essential tool ahead of election day, informing voters on where they can not only cast their vote but also grab their snag.

“It’s practically part of the Australian constitution. Or something,” the democracysausage.org website jokes.

Democracy Sausage
Australians will be armed as never before on polling day. Photo: democracysausage.org

And it doesn’t end with sausages.

As polling place offerings expand to cater to their triennial captive audience, the Democracy Sausage site includes up-to-date data on where to fill up on an election cake, coffee or bacon and egg roll.

The interactive map pins all polling booth locations across Australia, with icons showing food availability at various stalls.

A green plus symbol provides details on bacon and egg rolls and coffee availability, as well as vegetarian and halal food options, while the grey question marks represent polling booths for which food options are yet to be confirmed.

According to the website there are 1000 polling booths with sausage sizzles, providing 20.5 per cent of Australians with access to a democracy sausage on election day.

Bill shorten sausage sandwich
Bill Shorten’s unorthodox approach to the sausage caused a stir last election. Photo: AAP

ACT electorates lead the way, giving up to 75 per cent of voters access to a democracy sausage.

New South Wales has the highest number of stalls with cakes and vegetarian options.

NSW and Victoria tie for the highest number of stalls with halal options, while the Northern Territory has no stalls with halal food.

In true Melbourne style, Victoria leads the stall count on coffee.

The website crowdsources (or “crowdsauces”) real-time data from Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

People can use the the hashtag #democracysausage, or send a direct message to the website to help them track food availability at the polls.

The website is expect to fill in more grey question marks as election day approaches.

-with AAP