News Politics Australian Politics George Christensen won’t face any consequences for his InfoWars appearance. It’s not the first time
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George Christensen won’t face any consequences for his InfoWars appearance. It’s not the first time

George Christensen
George Christensen has caused controversy again, this time for appearing on American conspiracy theorist talk show InfoWars. Photo: Getty
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George Christensen has again sparked outrage over his pandemic comments, and party leaders have again avoided taking substantial action against the outspoken Nationals MP.

The current furore stems from Mr Christensen’s appearance on InfoWars, an American talk show run by prominent conspiracy theorist Alex Jones.

During the show, Mr Christensen laughed when Mr Jones likened Australia’s COVID quarantine facilities to Nazi Germany’s Auschwitz concentration camp from World War II.

“The rest of the free world, please stand with us, please support us, and every time we see people out there protesting, whether it be in front of an embassy or elsewhere, protesting for our rights in Australia, it really does embolden the patriots, the people who are for freedom in our country to stand up,” Mr Christensen added.

Back in October, anti-vaxxers did protest in the US and Europe against the Australian government.

Acting Nationals leader David Littleproud condemned Mr Christensen’s comments on InfoWars but mentioned no consequences for the controversial MP.

“We want to work constructively with George, but know that there are limits and there are boundaries that we as federal politicians have to adhere to,” he told reporters on Tuesday morning.

“He is a respected member of the party room, and we want to have a conversation with him about respecting the party room back.”

Hours later, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that he denounced the comments “in the strongest possible terms”.

It’s not the first time Mr Christensen has caused outrage with his controversial remarks.

Here’s a look back at the controversies that have unfolded this year.

Dictator comparisons

The totalitarian regimes responsible for the most heinous atrocities in the 20th century – think Stalin, Mao, Hitler, Pol Pot – they didn’t get there overnight.”
George Christensen MP

In November, Mr Christensen said “state premiers are racing down that familiar path” of 20th-century dictators by introducing vaccine restrictions, which he referred to as “medical apartheid”.

Mr Littleproud said he “tried to reach out to make my views clear” to Mr Christensen in the aftermath.

During the same speech, Mr Christensen said the only solution for unvaccinated adults was civil disobedience.

“As a son of a police officer, I believe that everyone should obey the law,” Mr Morrison said, without referring to Mr Christensen by name.

Fighting off masks

Masks do not work.”
George Christensen MP

In August, as New South Wales and Victoria grappled with unprecedented Delta outbreaks, Mr Christensen told Parliament that “it has been proven that masks make no significant difference in stopping the spread of COVID-19”, despite leading medical advice asserting otherwise.

Mr Christensen also claimed the virus “has a survivability rate of 997 out of 1000”.

Although the House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly to condemn Mr Christensen’s comments, and Mr Morrison condemned misinformation in general, the Prime Minister also said he wouldn’t “engage in a partisan debate on this”.

Nationals leader Barnaby Joyce, meanwhile, told ABC Radio that Mr Christensen would likely make similar speeches in future.

“I’ve had conversations with him – that doesn’t mean he’s a slave of anybody,” Mr Joyce said.

US election conspiracies

It is a dumpster fire at the moment … all because no one dared audit the vote.”
George Christensen MP

After Donald Trump lost the US presidential election in January, Mr Christensen posted unfounded claims about Joe Biden winning as a result of “dodgy extra votes”.

When asked about this at the time, Prime Minister Scott Morrison replied that Australia is “a free country”.

“There’s such a thing as freedom of speech in this country, and that will continue,” Mr Morrison told reporters.

The end is near

Although Coalition leadership were hesitant to slam Mr Christensen’s InfoWars appearance, some of his party room colleagues and former leaders did speak out.

“I want to assure Australians there are plenty of normal people in the Nationals party room who are doing their best every day to represent the interests of regional communities,” Victorian Nationals MP Darren Chester tweeted.

“Like me, they condemn the conspiracy theories, lack of respect and ill-informed comments of Christensen.”

Meanwhile, former Nationals leader Michael McCormack told ABC Radio that “Barnaby needs to call it out”.

A spokesperson for Mr Joyce, who is currently in the UK, defended Mr Christensen’s “right to say what he believes”.

Mr Christensen will not recontest his Queensland seat at the next federal election.

Until then, in the words of Mr Joyce back in August: “There’s nothing you can threaten him with.”