News National Pauline Hanson questions ‘Aboriginal’ definition, praised by Noel Pearson
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Pauline Hanson questions ‘Aboriginal’ definition, praised by Noel Pearson

pauline hanson
Ms Hanson's comments have raised the ire of many Australians. Photo: AAP
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Pauline Hanson has said there is no definition of what an Aboriginal person is, while in a separate matter indigenous activist Noel Pearson has claimed the One Nation leader has the ability to help his people.

Ms Hanson told Andrew Bolt on Sky News on Monday the definition of Indigenous Australians is loose.

“If you marry an Aboriginal (sic) you can be classified (as one), or if the community or the elders accept you into that community you can be defined as an Aboriginal,” Ms Hanson said.

“That’s not good enough because then if you make a comment about it, well what are you? Are you an Aboriginal or non-Aboriginal?”

Senator Hanson made the remarks while defending calls for changes to the Racial Discrimination Act.

The firebrand senator says she had previously raised issues about “equality” over the years about the definition of “Aboriginal”.

“I think the whole lot needs to be opened up on this, a big debate on this.”

She believes people have become increasingly precious, but it should be up to the public to judge controversial comments, including from her or indigenous leader Noel Pearson.

Mr Pearson has denied allegations he racially abused a Queensland minister seven years ago.

Meanwhile, on the morning after those comments, Mr Pearson had an opinion piece published in News Corp, titled “Pauline Hanson can empower indigenous Australia”.

Noel Pearson. Getty
Noel Pearson says Ms Hanson has the ability to help Indigenous Australians. Photo: Getty

In it, Mr Pearson wrote: “That indigenous Australians can find great champions on the far Right can be surprising, but it often turns out to be the case.

“Often, it is among the good-hearted Right that the strongest support for meaningful recognition and reform tends to emerge.

“The salt-of-the-earth National Party types, the people of the land, farmers and nativists — practical people with many indigenous Australians in their electorates — are most open to genuine, open and honest discourse with their indigenous countrymen.

“Given the opportunity, she [Ms Hanson] may also come to see the integral, ongoing importance of Ancient Australia, in all its rich contemporary permutations.”

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