News National Coles bans Zoo Weekly mag after online campaign
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Coles bans Zoo Weekly mag after online campaign

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Supermarket giant Coles has announced it will stop stocking provocative ‘lad-mag’ Zoo Weekly in its stores.

An anti-sexism campaign paid off after a 20-year-old Coles worker joined an initial push by a 23-year-old graphic designer, by taking the petition to her union, store manager and head office.

In a short statement to Fairfax Media, Coles said it had made a “commercial decision to delete Zoo magazine following a regular range review”.

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A spokesman would not elaborate on the reasons for the withdrawal.

The Coles worker, Shannen, told the company and the union the magazine contributed to an “unsafe workplace” and made her feel complicit in promoting “rape culture”.

A spokeswoman for Collective Shout who supported the petition said the supermarket chain should be proud of its decision.

Photo: AAP
Greens Senator Sarah Hansen-Young took Zoo Weekly to court for an altered image it published of her.  Photo: AAP

“It’s a really great decision and the fact that Coles are not willing to own that is a bit sad,” she said.

“I would encourage them to own it – it fits with their corporate social responsibility values.

“It just boggles the mind that young 16-year-old casual staff are having to sell this thing … it’s porn on training wheels.”

The graphic designer who began the petition, Laura Pintur, said the magazine promoted dangerous ideas to boys about women.

“By discontinuing Zoo, Coles has finally done the right thing for women and girls,” Ms Pintur said.

“[The magazine] teaches boys that girls like me and my friends exist purely for their sexual use.

“I couldn’t understand why Coles and Woolworths, which pride themselves in their corporate responsibility, family values, and care for their local communities could profit from selling this harmful product.”

Collective Shout are not calling on Woolworths to follow Coles’ call.

In a statement to Fairfax, Woolworths said they had no plans to ditch it from its shelves.

“To reduce the exposure to these magazines in our store, we have it positioned in the magazine reading centre in the aisle in the top right corner,” it said.

“We do not position it at the front of store or on the checkouts in recognition that some customers could be offended by the magazine’s content.”

Zoo Weekly has been constantly embroiled in controversy.

This has included apologising for an offensive photoshopped image of Greens Senator Sarah Hansen-Young and a contentious special Anzac Day issue last April.

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