News National Ad mocks counter-piracy push
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Ad mocks counter-piracy push

The New Daily
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Consumer advocacy group Choice has launched a TV ad campaign opposing the federal government’s plans to counter escalating piracy.

The advertisement was produced with the help of crowd funding and will screen via YouTube and WIN Television in the ACT from Monday.

The satirical creation features a fictitious Minister for the Internet launching his hand-made internet filter.

Choice says the campaign is aimed squarely against proposals that it believes will make the internet more expensive without effectively addressing piracy.

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Released late last month, the federal government’s Online Copyright Infringement discussion paper outlines proposals aimed at curbing the country’s growing problem with illegal downloading.

Proposed measures focus on Internet Service Providers taking the bulk of responsibility for ensuring its users don’t break the law.

In its submission to the discussion paper Choice argues Australians pay 33 per cent more than US consumers for the top 10 new release movies in Apple’s iTunes store.

“We believe the government has its policy settings wrong when it comes to combating online copyright infringement,” says Choice campaigns manger Erin Turner.

“Australians are frustrated with not being able to access and pay for timely and affordable content. It’s this frustration that is driving some consumers to seek a better deal on legitimate overseas sites like Netflix, and unfortunately driving others to illegal downloading.”

Choice says the government’s solutions will likely pass costs on to all internet users and not dramatically reduce piracy.

“Forcing Internet Service Providers to monitor and prevent copyright infringement through the use of an internet filter is not the answer,” Ms Turner says.

Watch the video here:

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