News Election 2016 Malcolm Turnbull may call truce with Alan Jones
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Malcolm Turnbull may call truce with Alan Jones

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Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull may be about to lift his boycott on Sydney radio ratings powerhouse Alan Jones after two years.

According to The Australian, Mr Turnbull “reached out” to Mr Jones, inviting him to meet with the prime minister after having been blackballed since a feud erupted in 2014.

Mr Turnbull has refused to appear on the entire 2GB station – which is also heard in parts of Queensland – since an interview between him and Mr Jones descended into a slinging match in 2014.

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Mr Jones accused Mr Turnbull of undermining then-prime minister Tony Abbott by having dinner with Clive Palmer, and told Mr Turnbull he had “no hope” of “ever” being leader of the Liberal Party.

Since becoming prime minister, Mr Turnbull has accepted 22 radio interviews – 11 of which were with the ABC, according to The Australian.

He has done six interviews with 3AW’s Neil Mitchell in Melbourne, but just one commercial radio spot in Sydney, with 2SM’s John Laws.

Mr Jones told the newspaper that Mr Turnbull was aware he had an open invitation to appear on the show, suggesting it could only do him good.

“We have had this kind of nonsense in the past with people like (Kevin) Rudd and (Julia) Gillard and even Paul Keating,” he said.

“I simply have said that no one has ever won an election by not appearing on my program.”

In the longer term, Mr Turnbull and Mr Jones’ feud can be traced back to 2012, when Jones was quoted as saying Julia Gillard’s father had “died of shame” from having a liar for a daughter.

Mr Jones was forced to apologise publicly, and a number of politicians including Mr Turnbull criticised him for the comments, the now-prime minister saying Mr Jones had received “a dose of his own medicine” via the angry social media campaign that erupted in defence of Ms Gillard.

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