News Coronavirus EU agency looks at J&J jab, clot link
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EU agency looks at J&J jab, clot link

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Europe’s drug regulator is reviewing rare blood clots in four people in the United States who received Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine.

The European Medicines Agency’s safety committee has also been looking at how AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine is associated with very rare cases of unusual blood clots and says it’s now reviewing reports of capillary leak syndrome in people given AstraZeneca’s vaccine.

Johnson & Johnson (J&J) says it’s aware of the rare reports of blood clots in individuals given its COVID-19 vaccine and is working with regulators to assess the data and provide relevant information.

“At present, no clear causal relationship has been established between these rare events and the Janssen COVID-19 vaccine,” the company said in an emailed statement on Friday (local time).

Of the four serious cases of clotting and low platelets, three occurred in the United States during the rollout of J&J’s vaccine from its Janssen unit, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) said.

That was in addition to one person who died from a clotting disorder reported in J&J’s clinical trial.

The US Food and Drug Administration said it is aware of a few reports of individuals who had serious blood clots – sometimes linked with low levels of blood platelets – after they received the J&J vaccine, and noted these conditions could have many different causes.

“We have not found a causal relationship with vaccination and we are continuing our investigation and assessment of these cases. Our analysis of the data will inform the potential need for regulatory action,” the agency said.

Nearly five million people in the United States had received J&J’s vaccine as of Thursday morning, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The report from the EMA is the first to mention a probe of blood clots associated with the J&J vaccine. The FDA said it was aware of the EMA’s statement and provided the agency with the data that formed the basis of its report.

The EMA’s statement follows an investigation of blood clots in the brain reported by some people given the AstraZeneca vaccine, which has prompted some European countries to change their vaccine recommendations.

In its report on Friday, EMA’s safety committee said unusual blood clots linked with low blood platelets should be listed as very rare side effects of the AstraZeneca vaccine.

It has also started to investigate reports of capillary leak syndrome – which causes blood vessel swelling and a drop in blood pressure – in five people who received the AstraZeneca vaccine.

The safety panel said it was not clear whether these were linked with the vaccine. AstraZeneca did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

-AAP