News ‘Sitting on a peacock having a brew’: The photo that proves the drought won’t break us
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‘Sitting on a peacock having a brew’: The photo that proves the drought won’t break us

Aleisha Kohler‎ posted this photo of her husband. Photo: Facebook
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This summer Australia has been rocked by drought and blistering heat.

Our farmers are scraping by week to week as bushfires rage across the countryside and our Prime Minister Scott Morrison momentarily went missing in Hawaii.

It’s a hard and hectic time.

But if we needed a picture to prove the wild weather won’t break our spirits – it would be this one.

Aleisha Kohler, from Gympie, Queensland posted this photo on Facebook of her husband sitting on an inflatable peacock, beer in hand.

Dressed in boots and shorts, Josh Kohler is taking his peacock for a ride in a huge dry hole – which would have previously been filled with water.

“Bit of a laugh during tough times,” Aleisha wrote.

“I hope this can add some brightness to your day. Nothing like sitting on a giant peacock having a brew. Merry Christmas everyone!”

Josh said he was changing up his usual rain routine.

Aleisha Kohler‎ posted this photo of her husband. Photo: Facebook

“Changing tack on the usual rain dance,” he wrote.

“See if we can’t get ScoMos #thoughtsandprayers to turn up with this little shenanigan.

“Had a bit of green after a light shower a week or two ago. Doesn’t take long to turn back into the Sahara. Got to have a bit of fun. Another day closer to rain.”

The picture quickly went viral, with more than 1600 likes and many people saying it gave them the laugh they needed.

“Real Aussie Christmas spirit, love it,” wrote one.

“May your peacock be floating in that dam shortly is my Christmas wish to you all.”

“At least you have kept a sense of humour in rough times,” wrote another. “Kudos to you, have fun guys and I wish you the very best for next year.”

Queensland, New South Wales and Western Australia are all at crisis point with severe water shortages and dwindling water supplies for many towns.

Data collected by the agriculture department shows that climate change has reduced Australian farms’ average annual profit by 22 per cent, or around $18,600 per farm.

On the return from his Hawaiian holiday, Prime Minister Scott Morrison acknowledged climate change had a part to play in the severity of the weather but said he wouldn’t be changing the policies towards it.

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