The new rules are a result of a foiled bomb plot on a Sydney flight in July 2017. The new rules are a result of a foiled bomb plot on a Sydney flight in July 2017.
Life Travel The new rules affecting carry-on luggage from June 30 Updated:

The new rules affecting carry-on luggage from June 30

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If you’re flying internationally, there are new rules affecting what you can take on board.

The Australia government has introduced new rules from June 30 that restrict the amounts and types of powders that can be taken in carry-on luggage.

If you’re departing on an international flight from Australia, you will be required to present any forms of powder you may be travelling with, in addition to the current requirement of liquids, aerosols and gels in your carry-on baggage.

The new rules will also impact domestic passengers departing from an international terminal, such as Terminal 1 in Sydney or Terminal 2 in Melbourne. (Note, your boarding ticket will confirm if you are departing from an international terminal.)

Substances affected by the new rules include inorganic powders such as some cosmetics, foot powders, sand, some talcum powders, powdered detergents and some cleaning products, and may not exceed 350 grams in weight or 350 millilitres in volume.

The new restrictions do not affect the carriage of organic powders such as baby formula, protein powders, flour, sugar, coffee or spices, for example.

Other exemptions include medical or therapeutic products and cremated remains (ashes).

While there is no limit to the number of containers into which you can pack the powders, the total amount cannot exceed the 350 grams or 350 millilitres.

At the screening point all powders in your carry-on baggage must be separately presented for screening. But unlike liquids, they do not need to be put in a resealable plastic bag.

As was the new rules on liquids, aerosols and gels on carry-on luggage that were sparked by the September 11 attacks 2011, the latest restrictions were a result of the thwarted bomb plot on an Etihad flight from Sydney in July 2017.

A spokesman for the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) in the United States, Michael England, told Bloomberg last month that  “improvised devices containing powder explosives have always been a concern of TSA’s”.