Finance More than half of Australian millennials don’t have a savings plan 
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More than half of Australian millennials don’t have a savings plan 

One in four millennials prefer the transparency of phone apps for their banking. Photo: PA
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More than half of Australian millennials (61 per cent) don’t have a savings plan and almost 50 per cent wish they could develop better ways to manage their money.

Yet almost a third (31 per cent) still don’t feel comfortable talking about money.

Those on the front foot financially are most keen to discuss strategies to get ahead financially (54 per cent) and developing spending and savings habits (53 per cent).

They are the major findings of a study conducted in April by YouGov Galaxy for Commonwealth Bank.

Examining the attitudes and habits of Australian millennials towards their personal finances, the online study found a third (33 per cent) attempted to save when they can.

But more than one in 10 of the 1002 millennials aged between 24 and 39 years old surveyed were still living from week to week.

As such, day-to-day victories such as having a full fridge of groceries (22 per cent), and paying for their streaming services (12 per cent) were seen as more achievable than the most ‘adult’ feat of buying a house.

Almost six in 10 surveyed aspired to buy property, but only 28 per cent had managed to do so.

But the Great Australian Dream remained alive with more than half who said they intended to buy a house within five years.

The other ‘adult’ goals include having a full-time job (37 per cent), saving more money than they spend (35 per cent), moving in with their partner or getting married (33 per cent), moving out of their parents’ house (29 per cent), having a full fridge of groceries (22 per cent), and paying for their streaming services (12 per cent).

Of those who save when paid, one in five (20 per cent) prioritise short-term savings goals, and 18 per cent prioritise long-term savings goals.

CBA executive general manager of everyday banking, Kate Crous, said Australians in this age group recognise the importance of having a savings plan but feel they need more strategies and tools to help them save better.

“We recognise many young Australians want to be more in control of their spending so they can start focusing on longer-term goals, whether that’s saving for a rainy day or buying a home,” Ms Crous said.

She said one in four millennials favour digital banking for transparency of their finances, so using smart features in phone apps were one way of assisting millennials to get ahead.