Entertainment Music Music Advisor: John Murry – The Graceless Age
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Music Advisor: John Murry – The Graceless Age

John Murry
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The Graceless Age
John Murry
Spunk

thenewdaily_supplied_51213_john_murrySTACK Magazine editor Jonathan Alley says: “John Murry’s downbeat, dusty, close-miked voice doesn’t sound old and ravaged for nothing. This southern boy – born in the same small Mississippi town as Elvis and a relative of Southern gothic writer William Faulkner – has been through the ringer.  Family alienation, religion, and addiction (including revival from a fatal overdose, as related in Little Coloured Balloons), are all visited here, and while the subject matter is a black as the drought stricken Mississippi mud, these songs are all possessed of an uncommon beauty.  Full of space and air, wound with musical toys and spinning, wayward atmospheres, this perfect suite of world- weary songs is one of the most riveting musical experiences of 2014. Murry visits in January, don’t miss him.”

NME says: “This Tupelo, Mississippi singer-songwriter may only just be making his debut, but he doesn’t give the impression of being green – opening track ‘The Ballad Of The Pajama Kid’ sounds like a grizzled blues band playing ‘Knocking On Heaven’s Door’.” 6/10

American Songwriter says: “This is an album that doesn’t hide its ambitions to be great, which is refreshing in an age when indifference is sometimes confused for integrity. Filled with concept-album trappings like connecting segments between songs, sweeping ballads, and even an epilogue-like closing track, The Graceless Age sounds like the product of a guy who’s been building to this moment, and he’s determined not to let it go without leaving everything on the table.” 4.5/5

The Guardian says: “The Graceless Age is extraordinary, a profound and moving meditation – the kind of album that answers questions you didn’t realise you were asking. Musically, it’s hardly unfamiliar – weeping Americana, backed with fuzzes of electric guitar and organ that slide in and out of focus, discomfiting and discombobulating – but expertly done.” 5 Stars