Life Eat & Drink Chocolate-eating wagyu beef cattle fetching big money for Mayura
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Chocolate-eating wagyu beef cattle fetching big money for Mayura

Chocolate is mixed with crushed biscuit and fed to the cattle station's Wagyu herd.
Chocolate is mixed with crushed biscuit and fed to the Wagyu cattle herd. Photo: ABC
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In the feed bunker of a South Australian cattle station sits 10 tonnes of chocolate, smelling something like cheesecake mixed with dung.

Mayura Station in Millicent in the state’s south-east uses leftover chocolate from a nearby factory to feed its wagyu herd.

“What we’ve got here is a bit of a proprietary blend,” Mayura Station’s Scott de Bruin said.

“We’ve got a few M&Ms, some Smarties, a few blocks of chocolate broken up, crushed chocolate, and biscuit meal.”

High-fat products such as molasses are usually used by cattle farmers to help in the fattening process.

Instead, Mr de Bruin sourced chocolate from a closer factory and says they have not looked back.

Wagyu cattle on Mayura Station are fed chocolate as part of a fattening strategy for fat marbling and taste.
Wagyu cattle on Mayura Station are fed chocolate as part of a fattening strategy for fat marbling and taste. Photo: Mayura Station

“Our customers started to tell us that our beef had this really unique flavour and was different to anything else they were tasting in the marketplace,” he said.